The Latest

I’m glad that it happened, I mean it
Between us, I think there’s something special
And if I lose my mental, just hold my hand
Even if you don’t understand, hold up

‘Till 3005.
Childish Gambino
Oct 20, 2014
#WIP @sfgiants #ChampionBlood #type #typography #typographyinspired #thegoodtype #thedailytype #handtype #handlettering #handdrawntype #lettering #customlettering #typespire #sketchbook #2014WorldSeries #SFvsKC
Oct 19, 2014

#WIP @sfgiants #ChampionBlood #type #typography #typographyinspired #thegoodtype #thedailytype #handtype #handlettering #handdrawntype #lettering #customlettering #typespire #sketchbook #2014WorldSeries #SFvsKC

Oct 17, 2014 / 113,959 notes

onlylolgifs:

Man gets a hard-on at the worst possible moment

(via toocooltobehipster)

Oct 17, 2014 / 71 notes
Oct 17, 2014

Travis Ishikawa’s walk-off 3-run home run to take the Giants to their 3rd World Series in 5 years. Goosebumps. Absolute, goosebumps.

(via Video: Ishikawa’s walk-off homer | MLB.com)

Oct 15, 2014 / 379,040 notes

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

(via toocooltobehipster)

Oct 15, 2014 / 138,563 notes
Oct 15, 2014 / 35,744 notes
Oct 14, 2014 / 214 notes

#SplashBrother’s four-point plays

putthison:

Fixing Snags
Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 
The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 
A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:
You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 
For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once your done, steam the area and admire your work. 
Oct 13, 2014 / 109 notes

putthison:

Fixing Snags

Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 

The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 

A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:

  • You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
  • A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 

For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once your done, steam the area and admire your work. 

Oct 12, 2014
Oct 11, 2014
Fresh drawer. #AnchorSteam (plus Shock Top and Blue Moon leftovers)
Oct 11, 2014

Fresh drawer. #AnchorSteam (plus Shock Top and Blue Moon leftovers)

(via Something You Never Realized About Jackie Chan. This Is Amazing.)
Oct 10, 2014
Oct 9, 2014